Monday, 23 February 2009

Time for a Pause for Both Sides in England's Membership of the European Union

England is not, at the moment, a democratic state. Its democratic provisions are being ignored or deliberately set aside by its regime, which remains in power by refusal to consult the people and by the threat of force to be used savagely against any civil unrest that attempts to disturb the regime's grip upon the state. The large numbers of economically inactive, maintained on the miserly clients' handout, is being augmented daily by newly-unemployed with little hope of finding work. Homes are being lost, bankruptcies rise, alternatives to inappropriate state provision in education and health move out of reach.

Credit and mortgages are unavailable and the Brown regime denies any hope of good banks concerned with traditional retail banking being separated from high risk-taking games in other organisations that share the word bank but none of the functions most people want from their local financial and savings institution. Banks are zombies, fronted by managements permitted to keep their jobs and statuses, animated by being underwritten by the state.

The New Labour regime responses to the collapse of UK financial structures and of the UK economy break every European Union membership rule in the book, even in these easier, 'understanding' times. The numbers of denunciations of the UK's behaviour to the Competition Commissioner and the number of member-states making them rises steadily.

It might be best for the United Kingdom to stand aside from the European Union until it either chooses to re-enter, by referendum, whether or not the Lisbon Treaty has managed to be activated, or decides to remain permanently in friendly but distanced relations.

Brown and New Labour's desperate defence of the City's status as an unregulated global casino and tax 'haven' is warping, though not thwarting, other member-states' responses to the recession. The United Kingdom is like a local, infected outbreak, leaking poison into the system and slowing responses to the problems of the Union as a whole. European Union member-states speak for themselves and for the wider interests of their Union; that is what they are elected to do. Unelected and untied to England, Brown tries to disrupt this basic democratic response as a matter of policy, of ideological commitment, as well as out of necessity (for the European Union cannot clean up the financial and economic collapse Brown and his stewardship have brought on us). He speaks of continents and world-wide action. Europeans act for their countries and their Union, and their peoples.

Germany acts to strengthen its economy and maintain its manufacturing skills and knowledge base, protect its financial system from further contamination, and to help member-states and neighbours to the East. Germans do not spout global non-democratic propaganda pretending to be offering necessary economic and regulatory solutions. Everything they say should be understood in the context of their democratic state and constitution and their careful evaluation of their relations with even the EU. Regulation is to be enacted by regional and national parliaments and then extended within the European Union by agreement. As Mr Berlusconi pointed out in Rome earlier in the week.

And as Mr Draghi has pointed out, Italy has so far expended half of one percent of Italian GDP on dealing with the recession. France is at three quarters of a percent, and Germany two percent (but they have the East under their wing). And their figures are probably close to the truth, which is hard to believe of New Labour figures, at least until very recently.

It was a great party in London, thank you for the invitation, we all enjoyed it, but Europa is going home now and so is the United States. England might like to free itself , at least for now, from European rules and elect itself a government that can clean up after the last 12 years.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

"England might like to free itself...from European rules"

Oh that we could.

Just to be consulted would be nice.

Nobody has dared to ask our opinion since the fraudulent referendum of 1975 (fraudulent because it mis-represented the organisation under discussion as a free-trade area and nothing more).

They won't either, because they know what the answer would be, and it would be an embarrassing nuisance for the regime.

it's either banned or compulsory said...

"The New Labour regime responses to the collapse of UK financial structures and of the UK economy break every European Union membership rule in the book, even in these easier, 'understanding' times. The numbers of denunciations of the UK's behaviour to the Competition Commissioner and the number of member-states making them rises steadily.
This is not the Governments stance when interpreting every petty licensing regulation be that for driving, farming, waste disposal, building control, fishing, health'n'safety or whatever.

"Germany acts to strengthen its economy and maintain its manufacturing skills and knowledge base..."
James Dyson was on BBC Radio 4 the other day declaring that UK needs to do the same thing.
That's the same James Dyson who moved his manufacturing base to Malaysia in 2002.

Gordon Brown announces a £4B illegal bung to Northern Rock to enable it to pump cash into the housing market.
He also announces a return to sensible banking with max 75% mortgages and, presumably, 3X annual income ( can he yet tell Barclays or HSBC how ro run their affairs ? ).
How is that going to work unless house prices tumble even further, ie to the level of 3 X average earnings ?

it's either banned or compulsory said...

Back On Topic

""Time for a Pause for Both Sides in England's Membership of the European Union"
Good, hopefully they will kick us out.

btw, England is not a member of the EU, UK is.